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The central wheatbelt town of Cunderdin was awash with pink at the weekend as locals pulled up their funky pink socks and pounded the pavement to raise much-needed funds for the McGrath Foundation.

The 5 km fun run was organised by Trufab Global, manufacturers of the well-known Grain King chaser bins and Rhino Buckets.
The organisation has previously raised funds for the McGrath Foundation through the hire of pink chaser bins at harvest time.
The Pull Up Your Socks fun run has further cemented the organisation as a strong supporter of the McGrath cause, and both of the pink chaser bins were featured on the day as the starting and finishing lines for competitors.
Trufab managing director Vince Trewarn, who donned a bright pink shirt and a pair of pink stripey socks especially for the occasion, said with the recent growth of the company, it was timely for the group to increase its community involvement and financial commitment to the McGrath cause.
“The rural people of Australia are our customers, families, and friends, and we knew any organisation we partnered with needed to support them.
“The McGrath Foundation made sense for us as their nurses are spread throughout the country and we had people in the local community utilising their services.
“With the company growing, we wanted to extend our donations further and decided to host an event that would provide a venue for everyone in the community to get involved with us, so that they could help us in this contribution as we know often enough that people may want to do something, but are unsure how.”
The event raised thousands of dollars for the McGrath Foundation, which funds breast care nurses in rural and regional Australia.
Trufab Global is among the largest supplies and manufacturers of grain handling equipment throughout Australia.
Grain King products include 18-tonne to 45-tonne chaser bins, 80-tonne to 125-tonne field bins, and 30-tonne to 45-tonne seed and super bins.
https://au.news.yahoo.com/thewest/countryman/a/32237208/wheatbelt-thinks-pink/#page1